Non muslim man dating a muslim woman

In countries across the region, men are legally allowed to marry anyone outside of their religion. For men, interfaith marriages are in line with Sharia law, and societally widely accepted. Women on the other hand, are required to provide proof that their previously non-Muslim spouse converted; otherwise the marriage is not valid. With the world becoming more and more globalized, one would assume that interfaith marriages would become increasingly common, and that more Arab Muslim women would open up to the idea of dating, and even marrying non-Muslims. But is this really the case? To find out, we talked to five Muslim, Arab women about their thoughts on interfaith dating and marriage.

Muslim men explain why it’s difficult to find a partner to marry

Date of publication: Despite changes in legislation now allowing Tunisian Muslim women to marry their non-Muslim partners, many are still reporting difficulties when attempting to tie the knot. In some cases, this is because they are unable to find a local notary who will marry them unless their partner converts to Islam. A ban on marriage between a Muslim woman and non-Muslim man, unless he converts, is common in Arab countries.

In Tunisia, however, such laws were scrapped in September last year. The couple have so far found no success in their search for a notary to officiate their marriage, with officials declining out of "religious convictions". They decided back in June to get married and have prepared all the paperwork - but so far to no avail. Some of them said that conducting such a marriage was against their principles and their conviction," Zaineb explained.

Two of the reluctant notaries in Hammamet, contacted by AFP , said they had yet to receive or read through the new regulations on such marriages. According to the local affairs ministry, however, regional and municipal authorities across Tunisia have been sent the new text. The justice ministry should take "strong action against those who do not apply the law", the Tunisian association for the rights of minorities said in a statement.

The association has found at least two other cases this month similar to that of Zeineb and Sergio. Yamina Thabet, the group's president, told AFP the ministry should "force all notaries to apply the law" and accused some legal professionals of "putting their religious conviction before the law". Tunisian human rights activist and lawmaker Bochra Belhaj Hmida said such action was "irresponsible". Tunisia has long been seen as a pioneer for women's rights in the Arab world, but campaigners say the country is still torn between conservative and progressive camps.

Hundreds of people demonstrated last Friday in Tunisia against proposed reforms opposed by conservative Muslims, which include equal inheritance rights for women and decriminalising homosexuality. The legislation will force the president, ministers, senior public sector officials, banks, judges, security forces, journalists and unions to declare their property. Tunisian Mohamed Aymen Latrous has been granted a year's residency in France after his heroic saving of two children from a fire gained mass media attention.

We use our own cookies and third-party cookies to measure traffic to our website and analyse browsers' behaviour, with a view to improving the services we offer If you continue browsing, we consider that you accept the use of cookies. View our privacy policy. August 08, Updated Breaking News. Tunisia Muslim women unable to marry non-Muslim partners despite law change. Share this page: Activists in Tunisia are urging local notaries to act in accordance with the law following reports that Muslim women are still unable to marry their non-Muslim partners.

Tunisia , Islam , Women , Hammamet. Sergio, a year-old factory director, was baffled. Rights groups have stepped in to demand an end to such obstruction by notaries. Read Also. The New Arab France scraps expulsion order for Tunisian fire hero Tunisian Mohamed Aymen Latrous has been granted a year's residency in France after his heroic saving of two children from a fire gained mass media attention. The New Arab Comments.

Most Popular. Loading Next Article Read More. Sign up to get this in your inbox every week Submit. Tick here to also receive our weekly highlights newsletter! We use cookies and other technologies to customize your experience, perform analytics and other customized activities. See our Privacy policy. Want to keep up to date with the latest news from the Middle East? Subscribe to our newsletter today! Iraq Report. Egypt Report. X We use our own cookies and third-party cookies to measure traffic to our website and analyse browsers' behaviour, with a view to improving the services we offer If you continue browsing, we consider that you accept the use of cookies.

View our privacy policy yes, I accept.

In effect, the predominant interpretation of the Koran is that a Muslim man is allowed to marry a non-Muslim woman, but not vice versa. According to all four schools of Sunni law and Muslim man can marry the women from the People of the Book (i.e. the Jews and Christians); Muslim man cannot.

Recently, Tunisian legislators added to their list of progressive policies the legality of Muslim women to marry non-Muslim men, in contravention of Islamic orthodoxy. Naturally, there has been both celebration and outrage at this latest effort to further bring Tunisia—and other Muslim majority nations—into conformity with the demands of widely perceived standards of gender equality. This latter interpretation was preferred by some, but Tunisian legislators decided the former interpretation was sufficiently substantive to override the decree. This has produced a seemingly irreconcilable tension, which makes one skeptical about the potential success of adapting scriptural norms to the modern nation state model. How do Muslim governments avoid granting these laws the same transcendent status of scripture?

But not all communities date. Muslims, for example, often get to know potential suitors with the aim of getting married as soon as possible, predominantly to avoid premarital sex.

President's initiative secures Tunisian women's right to choose spouse despite opposition from mainstream Muslim clerics. Tunisia has abolished a decades-old ban on Muslim women marrying non-Muslims as the president seeks to secure equal rights for the country's female population. The announcement came a month after President Beji Caid Essebsi called for the government to lift the ban dating back to , arguing that existing practice violates Tunisia's constitution, adopted in in the wake of the Arab Spring revolution.

Tunisia lifts ban on Muslim women marrying non-Muslims

According to all four schools of Sunni law and Shia law, interfaith marriages are condoned only between a Muslim male and a non-Muslim female from the People of the Book that is, Christians and Jews and not vice versa. In some diaspora societies, interfaith marriages between Muslims and non-Muslims take place at substantial rates, including marriages that contradict the sharia consensus. Islamic marriage rules between Muslim men and non-Muslim women are regulated by Islamic principles. There are restrictions to whom a Muslim man can marry which are further explained below. According to Qur'an 5: And [lawful in marriage are] chaste women from among the believers and chaste women from among those who were given the Scripture before you, when you have given them their due compensation, desiring chastity, not unlawful sexual intercourse or taking [secret] lovers.

Interfaith marriage in Islam

Date of publication: Despite changes in legislation now allowing Tunisian Muslim women to marry their non-Muslim partners, many are still reporting difficulties when attempting to tie the knot. In some cases, this is because they are unable to find a local notary who will marry them unless their partner converts to Islam. A ban on marriage between a Muslim woman and non-Muslim man, unless he converts, is common in Arab countries. In Tunisia, however, such laws were scrapped in September last year. The couple have so far found no success in their search for a notary to officiate their marriage, with officials declining out of "religious convictions". They decided back in June to get married and have prepared all the paperwork - but so far to no avail. Some of them said that conducting such a marriage was against their principles and their conviction," Zaineb explained. Two of the reluctant notaries in Hammamet, contacted by AFP , said they had yet to receive or read through the new regulations on such marriages. According to the local affairs ministry, however, regional and municipal authorities across Tunisia have been sent the new text.

Asalamu alykum, I am a mother of 3, two boys and one girl and we live in Canada. I am aware that Muslim women are not allowed to marry anyone but a Muslim man.

Translations of this item: Note to readers:

Muslim-Christian couples rejoice over decision to allow Muslim women to marry non-Muslims

It goes without saying that the marriage of a Muslim woman to a non-Muslim man is one of the main taboo issues in debates on Islam. It is absolutely the main verse that states a provision on marriage with a category of non-Muslims. Allah says: These invite to the Fire, and Allah invites to the Garden and to forgiveness by His grace, and makes clear His revelations to mankind so that they may remember. It is also worth reminding that polytheists were belonging to an aristocratic class of obscene wealth and indecent conduct, and whose lifestyle was reconsidered by the new social values of fairness and equity of Islam. The verse seems to urge Muslim men and women to choose the modest believing slaves over the rich arrogant polytheists even if the latter would look more attractive than the poor slaves. By getting married to slaves regardless of their social hardship, Islam encouraged Muslims to value people on other basis than their social class, and henceforth; find a balance between the differences established by the ethnic-tribal system at that time. The purpose was to absolutely avoid the marriage of Muslims to polytheists who made every effort to stand against a religion that was defending the most vulnerable people on earth. Muslim men and women were, therefore, encouraged to get married to those who believe, like them, in one God symbolizing a monotheism purified from all other divinities and injustice. Does it refer only to people who have just embraced Islam?

Comment: I didn’t expect to marry an Anglo Australian (and neither did my parents)

But at university, I had male friends who shared similar backgrounds and restrictions. This helped a great deal in navigating interactions. Forget taking a non-Muslim guy to my parents; I was never supposed to look further than the Sinai for a partner. It rarely meant falling in love with someone whose parents came from a different country and spoke a different language. But readers, this ideal — while culturally appropriate to my parents - was not sustainable in modern day Australia.

Advice to Non-Muslim Women against Marrying Muslim Men

.

.

.

.

Muslim Woman marrying a Non Muslim Man - Sheikh Assim Al Hakeem
Related publications